Tagged: internship

International Program Intern

 

GKI is looking for a passionate and enthusiastic person keen to support international development through the application of science, technology, and innovation.  The intern will support GKI through research, writing, and performance of communication and outreach tasks in GKI’s target geographies—Sub-Saharan Africa, Southeast Asia, and elsewhere. The intern will also conduct primary and secondary research on the economic, scientific, technological, and institutional contexts of target geographies.  The intern will gain experience in international development project management and support, while being exposed to an extensive network of international experts in foreign policy, development, and a wide array of issue areas.

The ideal candidate should have a broad interest in international development and leveraging international networks to solve development challenges.  Specific interest or experience in GKI’s target geographies is a plus, as is experience working in the field of international development.  The intern must display excellent English written and oral skills, with demonstrated interpersonal and organizational abilities.  A candidate for this position must be able to work in a varied, fast-paced environment, both in a team and independently.

Responsibilities:

  • Research and produce analyses of economic, social, and scientific/technological contexts in relevant countries, economic sectors, and institutions
  • Research and support development of training materials on collaborative innovation
  • Write press releases and blogs for the GKI website, and for dissemination to media outlets and development professionals
  • Communicate with international and domestic partners on behalf of GKI
  • Provide administrative and logistical support as needed

Qualifications:

  • In pursuit of a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree in a field relevant to science, technology, and innovation for development (Master’s preferred).  This may include but is not limited to: international development, economics, international relations, science and technology policy, public policy, or any scientific or technical fields (e.g. mechanical engineering, biological sciences)
  • Experience or career interest in international development
  • Strong research and analytical skills
  • Outstanding English written and oral communication skills
  • Excellent interpersonal skills
  • Attention to detail
  • Ability to work both independently and as part of a team in a varied, fast-paced environment
  • Flexibility and adaptability; willingness to take on new challenges and learn new skills
  • Preference will be given to candidates who can provide their own laptop

Location: Washington, DC
Weekly Time Commitment: 15-20 hours per week during school year
Start Date: September 7, 2016 (flexible)
Internship Length: Approximately 4 months (until January 13, 2017), with possibility of extension
Paid/Unpaid: Unpaid

Application Process:

To apply, please send a one-page cover letter, resume, a short writing sample (no more than 2 pages), and indicate 2-3 references to Renee Vuillaume, Program Officer, at renee@gkinitiative.org.  The cover letter should express your qualifications, experience, and interest in this position.  To learn more about GKI’s mission and programs, please visit our website at: www.globalknowledgeinitiative.org.

Resumes will be accepted through August 17, 2016, and will be reviewed on a rolling basis.  The preferred start-date is approximately September 7, 2016.

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Meet our two new interns: Srujana Penumetcha & Colin Huerter

We our happy to welcome our two newest interns, Srujana Penumetcha and Colin Huerter. Both will be joining us as international program interns, and both are about to begin the second year of their Master of Public Policy degrees at the Georgetown Public Policy Institute. We will put their bios on the GKI website soon, but in the meantime we thought we would ask them a few questions about themselves as a means of introducing them. They are both smart, well-read, and are appropriately enthusiastic about coffee.

Srujana Penumetcha

Srujana Penumetcha

Srujana Penumetcha:

1. What motivated you to get involved in international development?

“I first became interested in international development through my work with Amnesty International as an undergraduate. Having learned about various human rights issues and development challenges, I found myself searching for ways to make a more direct impact. My interest in international relations and eagerness to learn more about economic development and poverty alleviation led me to focus my senior independent study on conditional cash transfer programs in India. This helped pave the way for my involvement in international development.”

2. What has been your favorite graduate school class thus far (in your first year), and why?

“My favorite class in graduate school so far has been Development and Foreign Assistance, which was taught by Professor Steven Radelet. It was a comprehensive study of the role of foreign assistance in economic development and provided a foundation to think critically about the complex and inherent problems of the aid industry. The class was highly engaging and gave me an opportunity to learn more about the current debates on foreign assistance and aid reforms.”

3. What is the best development/policy related book or article that you have read recently, and what did you like about it?

“One of the best development policy related books I recently read is The Bottom Billion by Paul Collier. It offers important insights and analysis of the underlying causes of poverty and focuses on the often overlooked group of small countries that make up the poorest one billion. Collier uses extensive research, anecdotes, and rigorous economic analysis to explain how these countries fall into a set of “traps” that hinder their development. In comparison to other books that address poverty, economic development, and the role of foreign assistance, Collier presents a more balanced assessment of the effectiveness of aid and persuasively argues for a combination of policy interventions that should be context specific depending on the country and the particular trap.

4. If you could work in one country outside of the US, in which country would you work?

“This is a hard question because there are so many places I would want to work in! If I had to choose one though, I would have to say China.”

5. How do you take your coffee (assuming you drink coffee – if not how do you take your tea)?

“Strong with a splash of skim milk and a packet of sugar.”

Colin Huerter with Moroccan artisans

Colin Huerter with Moroccan artisans

Colin Huerter:

1. What motivated you to get involved in international development?

“I decided to enter the development field because it combined everything that I was looking for in a career: the satisfaction of working towards something greater than myself, constant opportunities for learning and growth, the chance to challenge myself personally and professionally, and the prospect of becoming familiar with different countries and cultures around the world.”

2. What has been your favorite graduate school class thus far (in your first year), and why?

“I was required to take a Comparative Public Management course and wasn’t really sure what to expect, but it turned out that I really enjoyed it.  It made me think more about the practical constraints of working in developing countries, and some of the lessons that have been learned other peoples’ experiences.  The class was very challenging, but very rewarding.”

3. What is the best development/policy related book or article that you have read recently, and what did you like about it?

“I originally read William Easterly’s The Elusive Quest for Growth: Economists’ Adventures and Misadventures in the Tropics some years ago when I was an undergraduate.  I picked it up again recently, and it seems more appropriate than ever.  It stands out as easily accessible amongst the generally academically-focused, and often boring, literature on international development.”

4. If you could work in one country outside of the US, in which country would you work?
“This is a tough question!  I have not been to South America or Sub-Saharan Africa yet, so I would pick a country in one of those areas.  Maybe Peru or Cameroon?”

5. How do you take your coffee (assuming you drink coffee – if not how do you take your tea)?

“Black, of course, no sugar.”

GKI Announces Two New Internship Opportunities

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GKI Interns Jason Clark (left) and Andrew Bergmanson (right) at 2012 Africa Collaboration Colloquium

The Global Knowledge Initiative seeks to fill two internship positions starting on May 20, 2013. These unpaid internships are open to current graduate students in the Washington, DC area, and are for a minimum of 6 months (through the end of November). See below for brief descriptions of the internships, and links to the full internship descriptions. Direct any questions to Program Officer Andrew Gerard at: andrew.gerard@gkinitiative.org.

International Program Intern: This position works with GKI’s LINK (Learning and Innovation Network for Knowledge in Solutions) either in East Africa (Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania) or Southeast Asia (Malaysia – we are also looking to start projects in Cambodia and Indonesia). The intern will support GKI through research, writing, and performance of communication and outreach tasks germane to collaborative innovation. In particular, the intern will undertake primary and secondary research on the economic, scientific and technological, and institutional contexts of target geographies. The intern will gain experience in international development project management and support, while being exposed to an extensive network of international experts in foreign policy, development, and a wide array of scientific and technical fields. Interns will be eligible for paid travel to an international pilot project (this is not guaranteed, but has been available to some interns in the past).

The ideal candidate should have a broad interest in international development and leveraging international networks to solve development challenges. Specific interest or experience in GKI’s target geographies is a plus, as is experience working in the field of international development. The intern must display excellent English written and oral skills, with demonstrated interpersonal and organizational abilities. A candidate for this position must be able to work in a varied, fast-
paced environment, both in a team and independently. This internship is unique in its scope and in the potential for international travel and professional growth — as such, it requires a level of dedication, creativity, and leadership beyond what is expected in many internships.

Click link to download PDF of internship description: http://tinyurl.com/GKIIntlProgInternMay2013

International Training Intern: This internship will support GKI’s international training programs, which we have implemented in Pakistan, the US, Rwanda, Kenya, and – most recently – in a training-of-trainers program in partnership with UNESCO in Tanzania. The intern will support GKI through research, writing, and performance of communication and outreach tasks germane to innovation training in GKI’s target geographies, likely East and Southern Africa or Southeast Asia. In particular, the intern will undertake curriculum development, training program design, and communication as related to GKI’s global training program. The intern will gain experience in international development project management and professional capacity building, while being exposed to an extensive network of international experts in foreign policy, development, and scientific and technical fields. Interns will be eligible for paid travel to an international pilot project (this is not guaranteed, but has been available to some interns in the past).

The ideal candidate should have a broad interest in international development and leveraging international networks to solve development challenges. Specific interest or experience in GKI’s target geographies and/or professional training is a plus. We are specifically looking for candidates who have experience or interest in better understanding intercultural communication and tailoring training materials for a variety of cultural and socioeconomic audiences.

The intern must display excellent English written and oral skills, with demonstrated interpersonal and organizational abilities. A candidate for this position must be able to work in a varied, fast-paced environment, both in a team and independently. This internship is unique in its scope and in the potential for international travel and professional growth — as such, it requires a level of dedication, creativity, and leadership beyond what is expected in many internships.

Click link to download PDF of internship description: http://tinyurl.com/GKIIntlTrainInternMay2013